Paul Mampilly Transitions From Wall Street To The Publishing Industry

Paul Mampilly is well into his second career which uses the knowledge and skills he developed in his first one. He was a very successful portfolio manager on Wall Street but decided to leave that rat race and do something else. He’s now in the publishing industry and offers expert┬áinvesting advice for small investors in his newsletter Profits Unlimited.He says that this platform allows him to spread his knowledge about investing to a much bigger audience than being on Wall Street. His investment newsletter, published by Banyan Hill Publishing, is based on the idea of spreading the wealth around rather than having it concentrated in the hands of the wealthiest 1%.

His life started in rural India. Paul Mampilly says his family moved to Dubai when he was a child in order to have a better life. When they moved to Dubai that city had not long before discovered oil under the sand so the economy was booming.Along with his sister, Paul Mampilly was able to get a great education that his parents were able to financially help with. He studied at Montclair State University and graduated in 1991, earning a degree in business administration. Later on, once his career on Wall Street was going great, he got an MBA at the Gabelli School of Business on the campus of Fordham University.He started out as an assistant portfolio manager and this experience gave him the knowledge he needed to become a portfolio manager a few years later.

He also worked as a research assistant and as a senior research analyst. He was recruited by a number of financial companies and ended up at Kinetics Asset Management. At this firm, he managed a hedge fund with $25 billion in assets under management.During his time on Wall Street, Paul Mampilly was one of the earliest investors in a few companies that are now major firms. These are Netflix, Facebook, and Whole Foods. He also an early investor in Sarepta Therapeutics which ended up developing muscular dystrophy treatments. Additionally, he took part in Google’s initial public offering which many other investors were pretty down on at the time.